STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)

K-12 Science & Math Education is Essential for a Skilled Workforce. Of the 30 fastest-growing occupations projected through 2016, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Occupational Outlook Handbook concludes that 16 of them will require substantial Mathematics or Science preparation. A series of reports from key business groups, scientists, and educators proposes a number of actions that must be undertaken NOW to improve K-12 Science and Mathematics so that we can ensure our students have the skills to compete in the world economy. These actions will be critical to maintaining our nation’s economy, quality of life, national security, and future scientific and technological innovations.
For more information:
http://www.nap.edu/books/0309100399/html
http://www.bhef.com/
http://www.aboutastra.org
http://www.usinnovation.org

Interest in STEM Education is Declining and Most Students are not Adequately Prepared to Succeed in College-Level Coursework


According to the ACT Educational Planning & Assessment System (ACT EPAS), students most likely to major in STEM fields in college (and persist to earn their degrees) are those who develop interest in STEM careers through early career planning and take challenging classes that prepare them for college-level science and math coursework.
FACT: Over the past ten years, the percentage of ACT-tested students who said they were interested in majoring in engineering has dropped steadily from 7.6 percent to 4.9 percent.
FACT: Over the past five years, the percentage of ACT-tested students who said they were interested in majoring in computer and information science has dropped steadily from 4.5 percent to 2.9 percent. However, students who plan early and strategically and have access to high-level and rigorous coursework are more likely to be prepared to succeed in the STEM fields.

Sources: 1. U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Institute of Education Sciences, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2007 (Mathematics) and 2005 (Science); 2. ACT, Inc.; 3. The College Board; 4. Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) and State Departments of Education, Data on Public Schools, 2003-2004; and 5. U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics.



http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2009161
http://www.milkeninstitute.org/tech/tech.taf?state=PA